January 30, 2008

News from Kingston University, UK

1. During the past 10 years how many formal grievances have been raised by employees? How many employees have raised such grievances?

Answer: 36 grievances have been raised by 28 people.

2. Of those grievances appealed to the level of Vice Chancellor, how many appeals were successful?

Answer: None (although one was partially upheld).

3. Of those grievances appealed to the level of Board of Governors, how many appeals were successful?

Answer: None.

4. Of those grievances appealed (i.e. beyond the level of Personnel to the Vice Chancellor and/or Board of Governors), how many employees launching such appeals are still employed by the University?

Answer: Two.

5. Of those employees dismissed on any grounds, please provide the percentage of these employees who were members of ethnic and/or religious minorities.

Answer: The University does not record employees religion. The percentage of employees who were members of ethinc minorities was 57% (4 out of 7).

6. Of all employees dismissed on any grounds, please provide the percentage of these who were non-British born.

Answer: 28% (2 out of 7).

7. Of all employees hired since 1998, what is the average length in years/months of employment of such employees?

Answer: From the data the University has recorded from 1998 the overall average length of employment in years/months is 3 years 1 month.

8. Of the above average length of employment, what is the figure for employees who are members of ethnic/religious minorities?

Answer: The University does not record employees religion. The average length of employment for employees who are members of ethnic minorities is 2 years and 10 months.

9. Of the above average length of employment, what is the figure for employees who are non-British?

Answer: The average length of employment for employees who are non-British is 2 years and 8 months.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

N.B. A key point -- the figures of all except 7. - 9. below are actually NOT for 10 years -- they are since 2005 ONLY. The University claims it has no records prior to 2005 for items 1-6.

Stuart said...

Wow! I guess those stats are not in the prospectus, and should be printed in the press.

Anonymous said...

Can you remind us again the process for getting this information so that as many academics as possible can obtain this information from their universities and ensure that it is in the public domain.

Universities are funded by public money. The public have a right to this information and also as Stuart suggests prospective students as well.

Transparency such as this is essential.

Aohra Behn

Anonymous said...

So since 2005 - 36 grievances - that is one every month and only one was partially upheld .

Hopefully this will be taken up by the media as it is in the public's interest to know these facts....

....or maybe not - maybe we should all keep quiet about it.... we are academics after all.....

Aphra Behn

Anonymous said...

Let us take a moment to remember the 34 employees of Kingston University who left after raising a grievance that was not upheld.

Think about what they have been through in the last three years...

Some will be fine....

Others may be in a state of such stress that they may not have recovered... they may be on medication... they may never recover... their lives in ruins....

Others may have felt suicidal.... others....

Can all those grievances (whatever their source) really not have been worthy of being upheld?

Does Kingston University really employ so many people who are such trouble makers that they waste the university's time raising grievances that are not worthy of being upheld?

Either Kingston should review their appointment procedures so that they weed out these troublemakers or..... or....

...what other interpretations might there be for this state of affairs....

I speak from my current experience of either being a trouble maker or a target of workplace bullying...

.... depending upon whose interpretation counts...

Aphra Behn

Anonymous said...

The process is to do a Freedom of Information request to the University, providing as specific a request as possible so that it makes it hard for them to deny the request, which can happen if your query is too open ended. The request is sent to the Freedom of Information Officer, who is often the same person as the Data Protection Officer. All public bodies must comply with such requests, though they can charge up to £10 for doing so.